Digital Pedagogy

As of March 2020, many institutions and universities moved quickly to online learning due to COVID-19’s infection rates. In climbing that mountain as an eLearning and Higher Education community, I’ve gathered some wonderful resources on the topic of “Teaching Online.”

Online Courses

How to Continue Instruction When You Cannot Meet in Person from Colorado Community College System (CCCS) is a wonderful start to understanding some of the differences between remote and online.

Online Pedagogy MOOC – Sandra Miller (William Patterson University) and her team put together a 3-week participatory course for instructors in the Canvas LMS. Modules follow the backward design structure and cover many of the main differences and needs of online courses in comparison to face-to-face courses.

Five Pedagogical Practices to Improve Your Online Course by Rob Kelly on Faculty Focus covers five central areas of focus for transitioning to online: effective discussions, variety in learning experiences, individualized feedback, wrap or reflection activity, and feedback from students related to their course experience.

Best Practices: Online Pedagogy from Harvard University is a wonderful website with highlights on some of the mindsets for online pedagogy. For instance, focusing on the pedagogy over the technology or the learning instead of the technology is a common piece of advice from eLearning experts. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the technology you need to learn in order to move online and lose sight of the course outcomes and focus of the course… which isn’t often the students using technology.

Effective Online Pedagogy by Angelo State University’s Instructional Design department starts with the three main things to shoot for when designing and delivering an online course: students do most of the work, high-levels of interactivity (with intention), online presence (social, cognitive, and teaching).

 

Do you have others you would add to this list? Let me know through Contact Me.